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Greystoke Primary School

Icold Road Penrith, Cumbria CA11 0TP

1768483572

admin@greystoke.cumbria.sch.uk

'R.E.' stands for 'Religious Education'. However, although we do focus on religions, religious groups and religious customs, we also learn about ourselves, the groups we belong to and are surrounded by, as well as what is important to us in life. Therefore, we learn as much about other people as we do about ourselves. 

Following this, we asked questions that we wanted answered about a photograph of the 'Jungle' in Calais. Here are some of our searching questions:

Do people live here?

How long have they been here?

Do they really live like this?

Why is there such a place?

Why do they treat this place like this?

Why would one want to live here?

What has happened here?

Have people journeyed here especially to get to this place?

Was it the end, the middle or the beginning of someone’s journey?

Was this a sign of no journey at all?

Who was staying here?

Were they here for long?

Are these refugees?

Where did these people come from?

Where are they going?

Though most of us weren't so sure how we could help the refugees, we knew that we wanted to help in some way. Some of us were uncomfortable letting a stranger into our own home and so having an asylum seeker living in our own home for a while was for many of us an option we weren't able to consider. Many of us suggested the idea of donating food and clothes. However, all of us wanted to sign the petition to make these difficulties end for these unfortunate people (photo above). We made a difference in the world on this day, will you make a difference

Another way we tried to play our part in making a difference was by writing to the French President and the French Embassy. Our persuasive letters have hopefully arrived by now and are perhaps influencing the next decision of one of the European leaders.

 

Have you made a difference to the world today?

Be brave.

Make one.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In order to remember and to help us empathise, we attempted to walk in the footsteps of Muslim pilgrims. As we were working within the restrictions of our classroom, we became creative with resources and drama skills to bring the hajj alive a little more. Do you recognise any parts of a true hajj?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our recent topic has been 'Faith'. In order to understand what faith means in other religions, we had to figure out initially what the term truly means, as well as what it involves for all of us. Having read and analysed many professional definitions, we then wrote our own personalised one:

 

Faith (abstract noun, and a link to many other abstract nouns) is a feeling everyone can, but does not necessarily always, feel. It means ‘believing’, for example you can believe in someone else who thinks they can’t do something when you know they can. Faith also can mean having trust in someone or something and involves never giving up.

 

We then created acrostic poems and a piece of abstract art using a variety of media to represent faith.

 

 

 

Faith means believing in something,

A team in which everyone helps each other, is a team with faith,

I agree that religions are linked to faith because you can believe in them,

To trust in your friends,

How to encourage your friends.

By Esmé and Lily

 

Faith is belief,

Although you cannot see it,

In the world, faith is all around,

Trust friends and family,

Have faith in the universe.

By Hannah and Grace

 

Faith in yourself’ means believing in yourself,

And never give up,

In what you believe,

Trusting in someone or something,

Happiness is helped by faith.

By Evie Dalton and Charlie Ferguson

 

Firm belief and never give up,

Although you can’t see it, you should feel it,

In lots of people it may be there,

Tangible proof not necessary,

Hope is faith, happiness is hope.

By Willow Lee and Katie Jackson

 

 

 

 

We then moved onto exploring how Muslims express their faith through art, in particular through the paintings and decorative patterns on materials. We tried to interpret the meaning behind patterns, shapes, colours and writing. They proved very detailed, well-considered works of art and thought. Just look at the sheer beauty of them - we were fascinated.

 

As you can see by the next pieces of work, created by Year 3 - Year 6, we applied what we had learnt about expressing faith through art in the Islam religion. We used this to express ourselves about our own lives; what is most important to us and what leads our lives.

Seeking Refuge - A Human Right?

To start off this topic, we first gathered our thoughts about journeys and what journeys consist of, mean to us, are linked to and why and how they happen. We create a big spider diagram whereby we critically commented on each other's thoughts or thoughtfully added on further ideas.

Then we linked these thoughts to objects - by connecting objects that compared to journeys, we created a long journey of our thoughts. We helped each other to refine our initial thoughts. Here are some of our initial and final thoughts.

(Above): A journey is like a fishing net because you can get all tangled (into difficulties) on a journey and in a fishing net.

(Below): A dog collar is like a journey - the collar takes the dog on a journey like a journey takes a person to a new place.

Lily: A journey is like a dog collar because the collar takes the dog on a journey and the dog doesn't always know where it's going. A journey sometimes takes a person to places where they didn't know they would end up.

(Below): When you go on a journey, you get to keep all the memories, just like a padlocks locks away something else.

Macie: Sometimes a journey is like a toothbrush, it can be smooth or a little 'prickly'.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We are delighted to announce that we have just received a reply from the French Embassy and a letter from the French Government.

Though one was written in English, the other was in French so we used our dictionary skills, to translate the content of this one. Most of us are pleased with the reply that, although not one particular strategy will be used, the French government is trying their best to combat the situation:

Dear pupils,

The President of the French Republic has received the letters that you sent on the 5th December 2016.

The head of the state, particularly sensitive to your approach, has asked me to thank you for the trust that you have expressed in him regarding your concerns.

Be assured that the head of state and the government are responding to this situation, respecting the laws and the rights of men, women and children that have been pushed out of their country by war.

Best regards.

Dominique Ceaux

 

Pilgrimages

Leading on from our topic of 'Journeys' and, in particular journeys to seek refuge, we began our topic on 'Pilgrimages'.

Pilgrimage = a journey to a holy place.

Pilgrim = a person who travels to a holy place for religious reasons.

We found it quite tricky to remember the difference between the two terms above and so we created a pilgrimage; it turned out to be a visual feast for the eyes, a great memory aid and a creative journey of empathetic thoughts. See for yourself!

Since we are very inquisitive individuals, we have many inquiries we would like to make into pilgrimages: 

Why is it called ‘a pilgrimage’ ? (Hayley)

Why do pilgrims have to journey to a holy place? (Sorel)

Why would people want to go on a pilgrimage? (Grace)

Which religious people travel to a holy place? (Jessica)

Do all religions go on a pilgrimage? (Grace)

When do they go on a pilgrimage? (Evie)

How old are they when they go on a pilgrimage? (Jessica)

At which stage in your life do you go on a pilgrimage? (Charlie)

Do you have to go on a pilgrimage? (Lexie)

What if you don’t want to go on a pilgrimage? (Thomas)

Does a holy place have to be the destination of a pilgrimage? (Katie)

Are there certain holy places they have to go to? (Lexie)

Where do they travel to? (Jessica)

How long does a pilgrimage take? (Charlie)

Do pilgrimages symbolise something? (Hayley)

Can you be forced to go on a pilgrimage?

Do they choose to or do they have to go on a pilgrimage? (Katie)

Do they have certain rules for a pilgrimage? (Katie)

Is a pilgrimage part of everyday life for religious people with different beliefs? (Amy)

Do you have to go on a pilgrimage every day? (William)

Why is it called ‘a pilgrimage’ ? (Hayley)

Why do pilgrims have to journey to a holy place? (Sorel)

Why would people want to go on a pilgrimage? (Grace)

Which religious people travel to a holy place? (Jessica)

Do all religions go on a pilgrimage? (Grace)

When do they go on a pilgrimage? (Evie)

How old are they when they go on a pilgrimage? (Jessica)

At which stage in your life do you go on a pilgrimage? (Charlie)

Do you have to go on a pilgrimage? (Lexie)

What if you don’t want to go on a pilgrimage? (Thomas)

Does a holy place have to be the destination of a pilgrimage? (Katie)

Are there certain holy places they have to go to? (Lexie)

Where do they travel to? (Jessica)

How long does a pilgrimage take? (Charlie)

Do pilgrimages symbolise something? (Hayley)

Can you be forced to go on a pilgrimage?

Do they choose to or do they have to go on a pilgrimage? (Katie)

Do they have certain rules for a pilgrimage? (Katie)

Is a pilgrimage part of everyday life for religious people with different beliefs? (Amy)

Do you have to go on a pilgrimage every day? (William)

Recently, we have had the privilege to meet Siddik, a Muslim man from Carlisle. He had plenty of inspiring, intriguing and thought-provoking points to make about his religion and brought in some interesting things to show us, such as a prayer mat and pictures of mosques around the world. We were given the opportunity to enquire about life with a faith different to our own and to inform ourselves more on topics such as rituals, beliefs and expectations in the Islam religion. He even showed us a prayer mat and how he prays.

Looking back at the experience, it has made us reflect about differences and similarities between the all the religions we have come across, as well as that different people have different beliefs about certain aspects in life, some of which can be hard to grasp for an ‘outsider’. This afternoon will now aid us in expressing the Islamic faith through the arts.

Thank you, Siddik!

 

 

 

Faith is a feeling we all feel,

A good friend has some faith in everyone,

In our heart, faith is always awake,

Things that need done, faith will always help,

Happiness is the result of faith and trust.

By Lewis and Isaac

 

Faith, a belief in others,

Amazing, how faith can create a bond between friends,

In faith you trust each other,

The bond you have, if you have faith, is unbreakable.

Happy to trust, you have faith.

By Nathan

 

Firm belief in what you want to believe,

A strong opinion can be linked to faith,

It is a strong opinion about what you want to think,

To believe in someone who is finding things hard,

Help yourself by having faith.

By Hayley and Matthew

 

Faith is believing what you want to believe but cannot prove,

A good idea is to have faith in yourself,

It may not be true but you may still have faith,

Trust is the key to faith,

Hate and doubt are the opposite of faith and happiness.

By Daisy, Jessica and Sophie

 

Faith means being sure,

An agreement has faith,

In a way, you can faith in your puppy,

Trust is the same as faith,

Heart is where the faith is.

By Hope and Sorel

 

Faith means believing in something,

And faith also means the opposite of doubt,

I think you can have faith in your friends,

Though you can also have faith in yourself,

Have faith in your soul.

By Lexie and Jack

 

Faith is the opposite of doubt,

Also you can have faith in your soul,

If you can have faith in your soul, you can have faith in others’ souls,

The faith you need in your life is belief in yourself,

Have faith in your faithful friends.

By Alfie and Amy